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Mandevilla without flowers


Question: mandevilla without flowers


Good morning.
My mandevilla, which I have had for about 2 months, is located on a terrace, full sun in the morning, half shade in the afternoon. Until recently it flourished regularly and copiously; now instead it has only one flower, and I fear it will be the last, because I do not see sprouts! The leaves, inotre, are partly discolored and partly very wrinkled. The nurseryman advised me to fertilize in small doses at each watering.
It doesn't work, it seems to me that the plant is suffering.
What can I do?
Thanks so much
Paola

Answer: mandevilla without flowers


Dear Paola,
despite the delicate aspect, the mandevilla plants are quite robust; to develop they need a large pot, with a good amount of top quality soil, mixed with a little sand, to increase drainage; and a bright location, but not too sunny. There are varieties that are well resistant to the sun, but in general they have names that recall the sun, in fact, like the beautiful sundaville. It is therefore more productive to place the plants where they receive the sun in the early morning hours, partially shadowed for the rest of the day. These plants in the production nurseries are very "pumped", to obtain at the time of sale plants already full of buds; to cultivate them at home it is not necessary to be so diligent, and I think that watering the plants with constant addition of fertilizer is excessive. Instead, try spreading a spoonful of slow-release fertilizer onto the surface of the pot. In the summer the mandeville plants may need watering every two days, or even daily; the result is a serious excess of fertilizer, if each time you add fertilizer to the water, even if in reduced doses. In all things, deficiency and excess are similarly problematic, and a large amount of minerals in the soil can also cause the death of the plant. I think it is therefore appropriate to fertilize your mandevilla less; or by placing only granular fertilizer (a little) on the jar, which will melt at every watering; or provide the fertilizer once a week, in half the dosage compared to that on the fertilizer package.
Faded and conspicuously ruined leaves can be caused by excess nitrogen in the soil; but this symptom may also be caused by mite infestation; in this case you should also see tiny yellow dots on the foliage, and some very thin webs; in this case, use an acaricide for plants on all the foliage of your mandevilla.