Fat plants

Composition of succulent plants


Question: Can I grow more succulent plants together?


Hi, I have recently followed this site but I find it very useful and interesting. I have recently approached the world of plants and together with my mother I am creating a sort of encyclopedia to know all the best treatments to supply to the plants we buy. We have a series of fat seedlings and my mother came up with the idea of ​​planting them all in a single pot (there are a dozen, all small, or medium-sized), is it a good idea? Is the time to do this job right? We would like to put the vase on the terrace, which is not closed but is still repaired.
Thanks in advance for your reply

Composition of succulent plants: Answer: the compositions of succulent plants


Dear Alessandra,
when we decide to cultivate a plant that we do not know, in my opinion the best thing to do, the first, is to find where it comes from; once we know that a plant is native to Mexico or Chile, we can then look for information on the climate of the area of ​​origin, in order to grow the plant in the best way. In my opinion, bringing together succulent plants in the same pot is almost never a good decision; this is because with the term succulent, or fat, thousands of genus of plants really come together, originating from the most disparate areas of the globe; it is therefore very difficult for such plants, due to a stroke of luck, to share very similar cultivation needs. Even considering only cacti, some flower in winter, others in summer; some love the full sun, others the half-shade; some are native to the highlands of Mexico, and therefore can withstand winter temperatures even close to -12 ° C; others, on the other hand, originate from semi-desert areas, where minimum temperatures are never below 4-5 ° C. So, if you really want to place plants in the same vase, you must first make sure that they need the same lighting, watering to be supplied with the same frequency, same soil, same environmental humidity.
Usually it is recommended to those who receive a plant composition as a gift (whether they are succulent or not) to divide them, to cultivate them individually.