Fat plants

Fertilizer


Question: Can I use manure to fertilize succulent plants?


First of all thanks for the advice given are very useful. My question. I can use horse manure for my succulent plants, and for other plants. Since I have almost three hundred of succulent plants. Thanks

Fertilizer: Answer: how to fertilize succulent plants


Dear Giorgio,
generally when I don't know how to fertilize a plant, because I don't know where it comes from or because I can't find information on it, I try to think about the place where it would live if it were not in my small greenhouse in the garden.
The succulent, or rather succulent, plants are many, tens of thousands, but we can group them into genera, which manifest more or less similar needs.
If for succulent plants you mean cacti, or spherical or cylindrical (more or less), with evident areoles and thorns, they are all plants originating from Central and South America, where they live in arid or semi-arid places, characterized by periods of great drought , alternated with very short rainy seasons.
These plants do not like to be fertilized, and above all they do not like to find so much nitrogen in the soil; this is because nitrogen favors the development of green and soft fabrics, easy prey to the cold, of various fungi and rots. So if you want to add some manure to the soil of your cacti, you will probably see them all beautiful and lush in the space of a couple of months; but within another couple of months most of them would be attacked by fungal parasites, or they would die in the first episode of a cool climate, because they would have developed new fabrics with little resistance to external agents.
This is why it concerns succulent plants, they are really too many to be able to tell you whether or not they like to be fertilized with manure; some surely love a fresh and also quite humid soil, maybe these would be good to find manure in the ground.
In general, for all succulent plants, use every 20-25 days (but even less, if you are unsure, avoid fertilizing; if you have just repotted your plants, avoid fertilizing until the following year), specific fertilizer , which to be healthy must have a low nitrogen content and a high potassium content.
Nitrogen and potassium are indicated on the package: N is nitrogen, P is phosphorus, K is potassium; after the initials NPK you will find three numbers, which indicate the concentration of the three salts in the fertilizer, so the first number must be conspicuously lower than the other two, otherwise you are using a fertilizer that is not suitable for your plants.